Ulrich Zwingli

Ulrich Zwingli Affirmed the Protestant Doctrine of Original Sin – PART 1

You can download this complete paper in pdf format here. Introduction During the Protestant Reformation of the 1500s and 1600s, one of the prominent disagreements between the Roman Catholics and Protestants was over the doctrine of original sin. The debate was not over what original sin is in all mankind from conception, for both Protestants and Roman Catholics agreed that original sin condemns all mankind. Rather, the debate was over… Read More »Ulrich Zwingli Affirmed the Protestant Doctrine of Original Sin – PART 1

Herman Bavinck

Herman Bavinck (1854-1921)

A brief bio of Herman Bavinck, a continuing Reformer in the Protestant Reformation: In the late 1800s and early 1900s, one of the most influential Reformed theologians was Herman Bavinck. He was a theology professor at Kampen Theological School (1883-1902) and the Free University of Amsterdam (1902-1921) in The Netherlands. John Bolt, former Professor of Systematic Theology at Calvin Theological Seminary in Grand Rapids, Michigan, called him “the real theologian… Read More »Herman Bavinck (1854-1921)

Charles Spurgeon

Charles Spurgeon (1834-1892)

A brief bio of Charles Spurgeon, a continuing Reformer in the Protestant Reformation: James Boyce was not the only influential Particular Baptist in the mid-late 1800s, Charles Spurgeon was as well. Spurgeon was one of the most influential Baptists in church history. He was referred to by many as “the last of the puritans” and the “prince of preachers.”[1] Spurgeon affirmed the “Second London Confession,” as was evident in his… Read More »Charles Spurgeon (1834-1892)

James Boyce

James Boyce (1827-1888)

A brief bio of James Boyce, a continuing Reformer in the Protestant Reformation: Another influential Reformed theologian in the 1800s was James Boyce (James Pettigrew Boyce). He was the first President of Southern Baptist Theological Seminary. Greg Wills, Research Professor of Church History and Baptist Heritage at Southwestern Baptist Theological Seminary in Fort Worth, Texas, writes, “Boyce’s leadership so characterized the seminary that one critic objected that the school belonged… Read More »James Boyce (1827-1888)

Charles Hodge

Charles Hodge (1797-1878)

A brief bio of Charles Hodge, a continuing Reformer in the Protestant Reformation: In the 1800s, the most influential American Presbyterian Theologian was Charles Hodge. He taught at Princeton Theological Seminary for over 55 years, from 1822 to 1878.[1] [1] M. A. Noll, “Hodge, Charles,” in Evangelical Dictionary of Theology, ed. Walter A. Elwell (Grand Rapids: Baker Book House, 1984), 513-14. Interestingly, in a letter to the editor of the… Read More »Charles Hodge (1797-1878)

Archibald Alexander

Archibald Alexander (1772-1851)

A brief bio of Archibald Alexander, a continuing Reformer in the Protestant Reformation: In the 1800s, one of the most influential Reformed theologians was Archibald Alexander. He was the first Professor of Princeton Theological Seminary beginning in 1812. Alexander’s influence at the seminary lasted over one hundred years.[1] [1] M. A. Noll, “Alexander, Archibald,” in Evangelical Dictionary of Theology, ed. Walter A. Elwell (Grand Rapids: Baker Book House, 1984), 30.

Jonathan Edwards

Jonathan Edwards (1703-1758)

A brief bio of Jonathan Edwards, a continuing Reformer in the Protestant Reformation: In the history of America, Jonathan Edwards may be her greatest theologian. Mark Noll, retired Francis A. McAnaney Professor of History at the University of Notre Dame in Notre Dame, Indiana, calls Jonathan Edwards, “the greatest evangelical mind in American history and one of the truly seminal thinkers in Christian history of the past few centuries.”[1] God… Read More »Jonathan Edwards (1703-1758)

The Baptist Catechism - Benjamin Keach

The Baptist Catechism (1693)

A brief description of the Baptist Catechism (1693), a later catechism in the Protestant Reformation: In 1693, William Collins and Benjamin Keach sought to show their agreement with and difference from other Calvinist Christians by producing a Particular Baptist catechism.[1] [1] William Collins and Benjamin Keach, “The Baptist Catechism (1693),” in 1600-1693, vol. 4 of Reformed Confessions of the 16th and 17th Centuries in English Translation, ed. James T. Dennison,… Read More »The Baptist Catechism (1693)

The London Baptist Confession 1677

The London Baptist Confession (1677)

A brief description of The London Baptist Confession (1677), a later confession in the Protestant Reformation: In 1677, Particular Baptists sought to join the various Calvinist dissenters who were opposed to the Anglican state church’s pressure on their congregations. In response, they slightly critiqued “The Westminster Confession of Faith” to reflect their Baptist distinctives. William Collins and Nehemiah Cox were the editors.[1] [1] James T. Dennison, Jr., ed., introduction to… Read More »The London Baptist Confession (1677)

John Owen - The Savoy Declaration

The Savoy Declaration (1658)

A brief description of The Savoy Declaration, a later confession in the Protestant Reformation: In 1658, several Puritans gathered to draft a confession that affirmed their independent view of church government. British Parliament had not approved “The Westminster Confession” in its entirety, and the group as a result opted to write a new confession that Parliament would find favorable. They only met for 12 days, probably because their document gleaned… Read More »The Savoy Declaration (1658)